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  • Rado World Travel

    Hi everyone!

    I'm new to the forums as well as the world of vintage Rado. I've recently come across this beauty of a World Travel. I did as much research as I could, coming across various forum posts from Mike184, Henry Krinkle, and even information from the website, Watch Carefully. After all that, I decided to pull the trigger as I felt the price was decent, even though I couldn't be 100% sure if every single element of the watch is original. It has yet to arrive and I'm very excited.

    Here are some photos:
    1.0.jpg
    1.1.jpg
    1.2.jpg
    1.4.jpg
    1.7.jpg
    1.8.jpg

    I have three questions I hope the more experienced members can help me clarify:

    1. Movement

    From some of the posts I've seen, it seems that these World Travels have the AS1701 movement. But the one I just purchased has an AS1581 which is within the same family of movements according to this website. So my question is, do some World Travels have the AS1701 and some earlier ones with AS1581? Or has mine been repaired with parts from different movements? Seller did mention that the watch went through a full service and some parts were replaced. Also, I noticed that these movements all have 25 jewels. Am I correct in assuming Rado modified them to be 30?

    2. Crystal

    The seller claims that the crystal is original but the cyclops seems a bit off to me (I could be wrong). I don't think that checking for the anchor in the middle would be a good way to verify the crystal authenticity because according to what I've read, this watch was produced between 1957 to 1961 (quoting MIke184 from a post in Watchuseek). And crystals with anchors were produced from 1962 onwards (quoting Henry Krinkle from a different Watchuseek post). Are my facts correct?

    3. The Anchor

    I've read that the spinning anchor was only introduced in 1962, prior to that, it was just printed (from this article in Watch Carefully). I just want to confirm that prior to 1962, were all the anchors printed? Or were some applied but were just fixed? In this post in Watchuseek, the same model also seems to have a spinning anchor. So all the facts I'm reading seem to contradict each other.


    Thank you in advance for any information!
    Attached Files
    Last edited by AnimaSolo; 05-22-2020, 07:46 PM.

  • #2
    Hello and welcome, I'd say its all correct. I have an early 60's President Deluxe with the same cyclops crystal, same bayonet type (pat. pend.) case back and an AS 1581 movement. Not unusual for Rado to use up a remaining stock of earlier movements on a new model.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for your response Tim! I was actually editing the post adding a point about the anchor. I'm trying to accurately date this watch but all the facts I'm reading sometimes contradict one another.

      It's a fun process though.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah , sorry but I don't think you'll get closer than say 60-62, we know that the first Diastars had the moving anchor in 62 but my President also had one and I think it's earlier as we've not had any recorded Diastars with a 1581 movement so I suspect they were all used up by 62. The printed anchor both pre and post dates the moving anchor as it was used on their manual wind watches also. Another interesting factor is that, like my President, it appears that your watch has no Ref.# on the case back, the earliest 3 digit World Travels date to 1960, so does that mean it's 60 or earlier? Unfortunately, the lack of a reference number and the lack of an exact start date for the "Automatic" moving anchor puts it in a grey area where I believe the best we can do for a date is very early 60's.

        Note: To further muddy the waters, your watch has a later model rotor, the rotors were modified twice between 1581 and 1701 but 1701 has modified bridges as well. There are no doubt examples of 1701s built on 1581 base plates but they're usually over-stamped with the new cal # Perhaps as the World Travel has a dedicated rotor it was fitted to remnant 1581 movements and put into some of the early World Travels, with Rado the possibility for these minute differences to occur is endless, but as you said, it makes for some fun trying to unearth the facts.
        Last edited by Tim.; 05-21-2020, 11:26 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Tim for your insight. Could it be possible that the watch is from the very late 50s? Maybe between 1957 to 1959 as they were supposed to be released then as well. As you mentioned, the ref numbers first appeared in 1960. And the lack of the actual start date for the "automatic" anchor means we can't say that those prior to 1962 did not have them (similar to your President Deluxe).

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by AnimaSolo View Post
            Thanks Tim for your insight. Could it be possible that the watch is from the very late 50s? Maybe between 1957 to 1959 as they were supposed to be released then as well. As you mentioned, the ref numbers first appeared in 1960. And the lack of the actual start date for the "automatic" anchor means we can't say that those prior to 1962 did not have them (similar to your President Deluxe).
            I think that might be a stretch, in 57 they'd still have been using the R line logo so It's later than that. Unfortunately there just isn't any accurate data to back it up. Perhaps if the patent applications for the symbol and the case back could be dated that might give an earliest cut off date. I note that yours also has a later R crown like those found on the Diastar "0", which once again would have me leaning towards early 60's.

            Note the small R rather than the extended leg and also that it's a decagon rather than round.


            .
            Also yours has the identical large logo case back used on the Diastar rather than this two piece arrangement, like it's been added on.



            JP has a lot of early Rados, he may be able to cast a bit more light on this.
            Last edited by Tim.; 05-22-2020, 12:16 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Tim. View Post

              I think that might be a stretch, in 57 they'd still have been using the R line logo so It's later than that. Unfortunately there just isn't any accurate data to back it up. Perhaps if the patent applications for the symbol and the case back could be dated that might give an earliest cut off date. I note that yours also has a later R crown like those found on the Diastar "0", which once again would have me leaning towards early 60's.

              Note the small R rather than the extended leg and also that it's a decagon rather than round.


              .
              Also yours has the identical large logo case back used on the Diastar rather than this two piece arrangement, like it's been added on.



              JP has a lot of early Rados, he may be able to cast a bit more light on this.
              Hi Tim, thank you for this detailed analysis. So just to clarify, the photos (of the crown and caseback) you have shared are from another World Travel? Or some other watch?

              This is a photo I've found on Watchuseek of someone else's World Travel which looks almost exactly like mine (except his is a 3rd party replacement crystal). The crown and caseback look the same. Here's the post: https://forums.watchuseek.com/f11/ra...d-1014708.html

              combination.jpg

              Comment


              • #8
                No, different model, same period, same case, same crystal and same movement other than the world travel rotor. Just slightly earlier, if you look at a 1581 rotor you'll see yours has the later style of rotor and of interest, your rotor is a bit more ornate and probably earlier than the WUS example.

                This is my movement.



                and this is the face.

                Last edited by Tim.; 05-22-2020, 04:34 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tim. View Post
                  No, different model, same period, same case, same crystal and same movement other than the world travel rotor. Just slightly earlier, if you look at a 1581 rotor you'll see yours has the later style of rotor and of interest, your rotor is a bit more ornate and probably earlier than the WUS example.

                  This is my movement.



                  and this is the face.

                  Got it! Thanks for all the info you’ve shared. After all that back and forth, seems that I’m back to “early 60s”.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice work, Tim. I was prepared to jump in, but you seem to have covered all the bases!

                    Nice WT, AnimaSolo (I guess we'll cal you "AS" which is appropriate for watches with A. Schild movements).

                    Welcome and congrats on a nice acquisition.
                    Brad

                    PS. I'm glad my website has been useful for you!
                    www.watchcarefully.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
                      Nice work, Tim. I was prepared to jump in, but you seem to have covered all the bases!

                      Nice WT, AnimaSolo (I guess we'll cal you "AS" which is appropriate for watches with A. Schild movements).

                      Welcome and congrats on a nice acquisition.
                      Brad

                      PS. I'm glad my website has been useful for you!
                      www.watchcarefully.com
                      Thanks for the warm welcome, Brad. I already feel right at home. And yes your website was useful. Information on vintage Rado is really hard to come by.

                      Based on whatever Tim has shared and your confirmation, I’m really happy to have acquired what seems to be an early 60s WT with everything in order. I can’t wait to receive it and get it on my wrist. Will share a wristshot for sure.

                      If you have any other insights to share, please do. This has been a very interesting and fun foray into a brand that I am generally unfamiliar with.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AnimaSolo View Post

                        Thanks for the warm welcome, Brad. I already feel right at home. And yes your website was useful. Information on vintage Rado is really hard to come by.

                        Based on whatever Tim has shared and your confirmation, I’m really happy to have acquired what seems to be an early 60s WT with everything in order. I can’t wait to receive it and get it on my wrist. Will share a wristshot for sure.

                        If you have any other insights to share, please do. This has been a very interesting and fun foray into a brand that I am generally unfamiliar with.
                        For the moment, my insight is this:
                        For some of us it is a badge of honor to obtain what appears to be a fine example of a standard-issue Rado model, and discover there is some unexpected variation that makes us question it--only to realize that it's just "Rado being Rado". At Tim suggested elsewhere, Rado appears to have made a practice of building watches with whatever parts would fit and were available, even having nearly identical pieces found with movements from two families (eg, Felsa and A. Schild...or AS and ETA). The varieties of case backs, hands, dial variants and movement versions can be staggering.

                        Happy to have you among us!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post

                          For the moment, my insight is this:
                          For some of us it is a badge of honor to obtain what appears to be a fine example of a standard-issue Rado model, and discover there is some unexpected variation that makes us question it--only to realize that it's just "Rado being Rado". At Tim suggested elsewhere, Rado appears to have made a practice of building watches with whatever parts would fit and were available, even having nearly identical pieces found with movements from two families (eg, Felsa and A. Schild...or AS and ETA). The varieties of case backs, hands, dial variants and movement versions can be staggering.

                          Happy to have you among us!
                          I think you’ve summed up my experience rather well. But due to “Rado being Rado”, I suppose it would be difficult to identify frankens. Anyway, I don’t think this will be my last vintage Rado.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hello and welcome to the family.
                            Congratulations on your World Travel. It was also one of the first Rado models I bought, way back in the mists of time, and I still have a soft spot for it even though I haven't worn it for a long time.
                            Frankens are often so blatant that they are easily identified, although they still look nice enough to fool many non-Rado aficionados.
                            I look forward to seeing the watch when it arrives and hope you enjoy the rabbit hole you've just fallen down.

                            WP_20161213_13_49_27_Pro (3).jpg
                            http://s145.photobucket.com/user/sco...deshow/Watches

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hello and welcome. You've made a good choice for a first Rado. The World Travel is a lovely model and I have no good reason to doubt your watch and I really have nothing to add to what Tim has told you.
                              Solve all your doubts through question mode.

                              Comment

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