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First observation of a numbered movement in a non-Chronometer Rado?

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  • Watch Carefully
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim. View Post

    I found the other example here and Miles' contribution to this forum was immediately evident. He's posted a movement with similar markings but in typical Miles style, it's a 36000vph movement and instead of the jewels being rubies they're diamonds, just amazing. I miss that kinda stuff.
    That's a fascinating thread. We have learned a lot since then, but are still always learning!

    'Tis a pity that his project (to house that 36,000 movement) wasn't finished and shared here by Miles himself.

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  • Tim.
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim. View Post
    I remember way back asking a question about some extra numbers on a non chronometer DS movement and looking back, perhaps it was an example of the same practice, but that's only 2 examples. You'd think there'd be more. I do agree however that if it's available and they need it, Rado will use it.
    I found the other example here and Miles' contribution to this forum was immediately evident. He's posted a movement with similar markings but in typical Miles style, it's a 36000vph movement and instead of the jewels being rubies they're diamonds, just amazing. I miss that kinda stuff.
    Last edited by Tim.; 02-26-2020, 03:38 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim.
    replied
    Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post

    My understanding is that the movements must be numbered before testing, so they can be identified from identical ones, and so the number is registered. In the chronometry competition heyday, movements would be submitted more than once, and records for the life of the movement were kept, so that number is necessary.
    What happens to all the numbers that fail, are they retired for ever or are they resubmitted on other movements in a later batch? And if they do reissue the same numbers, is there another movement out there that passed with the same number as this failed one?
    Last edited by Tim.; 02-26-2020, 03:25 AM.

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  • Tim.
    replied
    So, come on EoT's, dredge the memory banks, can we think of more examples?

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  • Tim.
    replied
    Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post

    My understanding is that the movements must be numbered before testing, so they can be identified from identical ones, and so the number is registered. In the chronometry competition heyday, movements would be submitted more than once, and records for the life of the movement were kept, so that number is necessary.
    Well if that's the case then perhaps it is a failed chronometer they've used and I'm surprised we haven't seen more examples of this. I remember way back asking a question about some extra numbers on a non chronometer DS movement and looking back, perhaps it was an example of the same practice, but that's only 2 examples. You'd think there'd be more. I do agree however that if it's available and they need it, Rado will use it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Watch Carefully
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim. View Post
    ... I would have thought those numbers would be issued by the testing authority after they pass it, not stamped on the movement before it's sent for testing.
    My understanding is that the movements must be numbered before testing, so they can be identified from identical ones, and so the number is registered. In the chronometry competition heyday, movements would be submitted more than once, and records for the life of the movement were kept, so that number is necessary.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim.
    replied
    It looks very much like a chronometer movement, right down to the decoration on the rotor, which as we've discussed somewhere previously only seems to be found on the chronometer movements. I'm guessing the hypothesis is that it's a failed chronometer movement that's been used but I'd be surprised as I would have thought those numbers would be issued by the testing authority after they pass it, not stamped on the movement before it's sent for testing. So perhaps it's been swapped at some stage by Rado under warranty or by a repair shop that had a spare chronometer movement.
    Last edited by Tim.; 02-25-2020, 04:50 PM.

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  • Watch Carefully
    replied
    Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
    It makes me wonder why a Manhattan otherwise identical to mine (which I am nearly certain is 100% original) would have a 25j movement...especially one that is numbered. Is this the "parts is parts" mentality (we've discussed before) at work?
    Any thoughts on this, esteemed resident experts?

    Leave a comment:


  • First observation of a numbered movement in a non-Chronometer Rado?

    I discovered something unexpected on the web today. Images of a Rado Manhattan clearly show the movement (presumably an AS 1859) has a 4-digit number like those seen on Chronometers. Our working hypothesis for many years now has been that Rado only numbered their chronometer movements* (because it is required for testing/certification). I wonder what this example signifies. Two options spring readily to mind:
    1. Replacement movement (whether factory or otherwise)
    2. This movement did not pass chronometer testing, was returned to Rado and used in a non-chronometer model
    As always when discussing vintage Rado information, "the world may never know."

    My chronometer-certified AS 1859:



    The one spotted online:



    Note: they have the same type of regulator. I'll have to see if non-chonometer AS 1859s (or 190Xs of similar design) have something different...

    Update: the basic 17j version in my US-market Manhattan has the same regulator:



    It makes me wonder why a Manhattan otherwise identical to mine (which I am nearly certain is 100% original) would have a 25j movement...especially one that is numbered. Is this the "parts is parts" mentality (we've discussed before) at work?

    *Note Silverlepor Rado 847 movements based on Longines Cal. 847 movements were also numbered and not certified.
    Last edited by Watch Carefully; 02-08-2020, 04:56 PM.
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