Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Theory for why we have DS1 and DS1/E

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Hi Mike, I've done the compatibility test and DS1 and DS1/E backs are interchangeable and even a DS1 8 digit will fit, although the reverse isn't true. I own a DS1 with bayonet back and spring bars into the TC also and would've thought of it as Gen 1, it's virtually a zero case with a different case back, anyway mine has an AS 1700/01 fitted and that's interchangeable with ETA right up to 2836-2? makes life easy for the good Dr.
    Last edited by Tim.; 05-12-2017, 08:01 PM.

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
      Hi Tim,
      I can answer this question:
      AS 1903 is an AS 1902 with date. They use the same base plate, I believe, so it is marked as 1902/03. This is also seen on AS 1700/01 in some Rados (such as my 56-H below).

      http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...&2uswk&AS_1902
      http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...&2uswk&AS_1903

      Chronometer # at left, caliber number at right:


      I should clarify, too, that what I call a chronometer number is just a movement number. It's not really a serial number (as other movements in the production series were not necessarily numbered sequentially), and it wasn't issued by the certifying body (to my knowledge). It is simply a common requirement that all movements submitted for chronometer testing/certification must be numbered. I expect two mfrs could submit movements using the same number, and the testing facility would differentiate them in testing, and on the certificates, by the name of manufacturer, caliber # and other dissimilarities.
      I can confirm that completely.

      Additionally info to AS-markings:
      Following Roland Ranfft, AS-movements using the same base plate wear often wrong marks. The marked base plates had been in stock - AS needed them and used them without changing the mark. So simple.
      Sometimes they marked additionally, e.g. the AS 1789 has the same base plate as the AS 1701, so itīs almost marked with AS 1700/01 under the balance wheel and an additional AS 1789 beside.

      AS 1789.jpg

      Some AS movements were just an interim level of development but though wore own caliber numbers and were just made for a short interim period, e.g. the AS 1858 and 1859. I never saw one of them in another watch than a Rado. Thatīs why Roland doesnīt list them in his register.

      To the chronometer-certification:
      Bradīs info is right. The COSC (which is a private organisation, not an authority) is testing movements only (not complete watches as itīs done in Germany). Today the movements (automatic ones without rotor) arrive there in standardised clear acrylic cases with standardised crowns, standardised white dials and standardised black seconds hands - and with registration numbers of the watch companies. They never leave this case during the test.

      COSC.jpg

      But I donīt know the regulations at the beginning. And the COSC was founded not until 1973. Before 1973, there had been 7 different observatories in Switzerland with own regulations. After the COSC had been established to standardise these regulations, it surely took some time to come to an agreement and to coordinate these seven observatories (today they still have three).

      That means the time period of DS 1 and 1/E ended before the COSC was founded. And Bradīs nice AS 1701-movement from his 56-H chronometer had been tested probably at the observatory in Biel, which still exists, sited just 12 km away from Lengnau.
      Last edited by mike184; 05-12-2017, 08:06 PM.
      Best regards, Mike
      vintage-rado.de

      Comment


      • #48
        Great detailed information Mike. Just a quick note: It's possible that there are DS1/E COSC chronos, there are 2 in this thread, both belonging to Jose, that date to '73 and one is a chronometer. It's a bit unfortunate though, so far we can only base any of this theory on actual data from 7 watches. So it's a bit thin.
        Last edited by Tim.; 05-12-2017, 09:38 PM.

        Comment


        • #49
          More data from my collection:
          Iīm starting with a DS1/E Chrono 101:







          DS 1 Chrono AS1858 911:







          DS 1 (?) Chrono ETA 2824:







          DS 1 AS1858 912:







          And my actual DS 1/E Chrono with a ETA 2783 408 (without detail pics, sorry):



          I also own a DS 1 with a AS 1700 and the earlier shown DS1 with the ETA 2782 008

          Hope that helps..
          Pimpclinic.v.s.o.p.

          Comment


          • #50
            This will certainly help Marcus, thank you. I'll try to make some sort of spreadsheet and see where that leads.

            Comment


            • #51
              I just re-read this entire thread and familiarised myself with information I had forgotten. My take-away message is this:
              You guys are passionate, smart, and willing to share information...and the excellent results of working together are evident. Great job!

              Question for the team: do you want me to approach Rado with a summary of this information and ask for their input?
              If so, perhaps we can collaborate in distilling the significant points into one post in this thread and I can share the URL with Herr Kaenzig at Lengnau.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
                I just re-read this entire thread and familiarised myself with information I had forgotten. My take-away message is this:
                You guys are passionate, smart, and willing to share information...and the excellent results of working together are evident. Great job!

                Question for the team: do you want me to approach Rado with a summary of this information and ask for their input?
                If so, perhaps we can collaborate in distilling the significant points into one post in this thread and I can share the URL with Herr Kaenzig at Lengnau.
                We've got nothing to lose and who knows, maybe if we share with Herr Kaenzig he'll share with us.

                Comment

                Working...
                X