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Can you scratch sapphire? Well, yes.

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  • Can you scratch sapphire? Well, yes.

    I actually don't exactly know how I got this hairline across the crystal, but suspect it happened when I took a pretty good fall on some ice a few months ago.

    As I fell, I bounced my wrist and arm against a rough brick wall on the way down. I also managed to scratch the bracelet and lugs pretty good back then and noticed those right away. I was okay, except for feeling silly for falling in the first place.

    I knew I had this scratch across the crystal for a while, but it's the first time the light hit it just right for me to capture it. You can feel it with your finger nail. It's a good one!

    Still love the watch just as it is, scuffs, scratches and all. It, by the way, never skipped a beat, and hasn't wound down since I got it.

    JP

    They've done studies, you know. 60% of the time, it works every time.

  • #2
    It's almost impossible. Must have hit something and a bit of weight dragging it across something!
    TKite,
    Hydronaut

    I need a new watch

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    • #3
      Originally posted by TKite View Post
      It's almost impossible. Must have hit something and a bit of weight dragging it across something!
      I'd qualify as 'a bit of weight'...
      JP

      They've done studies, you know. 60% of the time, it works every time.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TKite View Post
        It's almost impossible. Must have hit something and a bit of weight dragging it across something!
        Key word there 'almost;' I've done it twice. Once a band broke on a Ball pilot style when I was climbing, I was surprised the sapphire didn't shatter. The other was an Aquatimer, no clue what I hit, but there was a scratch that looked closer to a chip, small but noticeable.

        I love watches with 'character,' JP. Cool!

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        • #5
          I've never seen it happen in person. As to the weight, I didn't want to imply anything
          TKite,
          Hydronaut

          I need a new watch

          Comment


          • #6
            Could it be that there is a coating that is scratched, but the sapphire is intact?

            Otherwise, there must have been a bit of diamond in the composition of that brick!

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            • #7
              Actually it is pretty easy to scratch depending on what you contact it with. Concrete or brick will mark the sh@t out of it with minor contact. I have done it a number of times. It is also not too hard to chip it either. I went for a long time with several scratches and a chip out of the crystal on my first Seadweller and I have scratched my B&M Cappeland and a Seamaster. I had all of them replaced and overhauled by my insurance, so it did not hurt too bad.
              I am living the dream in Hawaii.

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              • #8
                Watch sapphires are basically aluminium oxide, just like the grit on sandpaper. There are particles in fired bricks and concrete that are equally as hard and will scratch it, along with hardened metals like tool steel and of course tungsten carbide. If impacted hard enough, as Vince said, it's also prone to chip.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by JP(Canada) View Post

                  I'd qualify as 'a bit of weight'...
                  lol
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    Tried buffing it out with a cape cod cloth??
                    TKite,
                    Hydronaut

                    I need a new watch

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TKite View Post
                      Tried buffing it out with a cape cod cloth??
                      No, but that won't work. What 'might' work is to use diamond paste and a lof effort, but I'm worried about creating too much heat with the dremel and affect the crystal gasket. I'll leave it be.
                      JP

                      They've done studies, you know. 60% of the time, it works every time.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Someone who's into lapidary and has the right equipment would be able to polish it out, but you'd have remove the crystal and by the time you go to all that trouble you might as well put a new crystal in, cause it's going to have to be pressure tested either way. As you say, leave it be is the best option, it's not all that noticeable anyway.

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