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  • #16

    Back on subject......


    Originally posted by TKite View Post
    Let's just dig out the Hyperdrive plans from Area51 and we can get there in a jif....
    I do agree with George on rocketry - it's just not going to cut it for real space travel, we need 'warp' drives and much more advanced technology to come into play.

    With all that said, if you were going to go on a mission to space - I mean really space, not just low earth orbit on the ISS, but a Moon, Mars, or beyond mission, which watches would you want to take along with you for use on the mission and why? Please consider the very fine dust particles present on the moon, and probably mars as well in your thoughts on this subject. Apollo astronauts had issues with moon dust getting into the glove joints, and also wearing away at the knee/shin layer of their space suits. So not only was that dust very fine, but it was very course and potentially a problem.

    My top picks for a space mission - Moon, Mars, or beyond, would be:

    1) Rolex Cosmograph - aka the "Daytona".

    Why: The modern Rolex in house movement is incredibly accurate and robust, it features a triplock screw down crown, and screw down pushers and is waterproof to 100M, making it more ideal for extravehicular activities such as walking outside on the Lunar or Martian surfaces. Has subdials for timing, and a tachymeter for other uses.

    2) Fortis Cosmonauts Chronograph.

    Why: The Fortis official Cosmonauts Chronograph has been in use for missions on the ISS for many years now. It's an accurate and reliable watch. My only concern would be it's ability to keep out dust particles on Lunar or Martian surfaces. In those cases, the Fortis would probably be regulated to inner spacecraft duties, unless it were in orbit EVA situations where dust particals were not a real issue.

    3) Glycine Airman 24 hr. DC4.

    Why: It can track two timezones without an extra complication in 24 hr mode, is light weight, and is waterproof to 200M with a screw down crown. Tough and reliable. Set it and forget it. Also, thanks to George, I own one
    TKite,
    Hydronaut

    I need a new watch

    Comment


    • #17
      Argh... no takers. Oh well.
      TKite,
      Hydronaut

      I need a new watch

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by TKite View Post
        ... if you were going to go on a mission to space - I mean really space, not just low earth orbit on the ISS, but a Moon, Mars, or beyond mission, which watches would you want to take along with you for use on the mission and why? ...

        I like the idea--but have not found time to consider a suitable reply.
        Maybe some other chaps have formulated their ideas...?

        Comment


        • #19
          I'm with you guys on spending more on exploration of space and less on wars. NASA spending during the space race yielded more return than was spent, and I think similar results would be found for a trip to Mars.

          On the topic of watches, something tough and reliable, and I think there is merit to what T says about a screwdown crown, along with a robust, and accurate movement. I could see Omega doing a Speedmaster with such qualities too, and it would not take all that much. I know they did a few Co-axil auto Speedies before, so what's to stop them from adding an increased WR rating and screwdown crown?? Hey, a guy can dream, right!?

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          • #20
            My 'Space Trifecta'



            image_26414.jpg


            FortisCosmonautsWatch.jpg
            Glycine Bond Strap.jpg
            Last edited by TKite; 10-03-2019, 10:21 AM.
            TKite,
            Hydronaut

            I need a new watch

            Comment


            • #21
              I've never owned one, but I believe the Omega X-33 (Gen 1) was very well suited to space exploration.
              Not being mechanical, perhaps it is less susceptible to damage from dust (or equally so in different ways?).
              Light-weight, rugged, multi-functional...
              It's the first watch I would look at for such a mission.

              Comment


              • #22
                The X-33, an 1861 Speedy Pro, and, believe it or not, a Seiko Turtle. I chose Seiko because I learned long ago to rely on the breed under tough circumstances. Good lume, accurate, and very tough for situations where tough equipment is needed. Lastly, it has a day as well as a date. When you are away from civilization, or even work at home as I do, the very first thing you lose track of is the day of the week.

                George
                Cardigan American Princess Celeste says, "It's too quiet. You guys get up off your butts and start doing things."

                Comment


                • #23
                  I think this is a very interesting idea for a post T, just haven't had time to give it proper consideration but I will add this. George's comment got me to thinking re Seiko and I don't know if it's already been mentioned but I thought I'd add to the ranks of tried and tested, the Seiko 6139-6002 AKA the "Pogue". I have some other ideas too, more later.

                  Tim.


                  Seiko 6139 of Colonel Pogue ( Credits: Heritage Auction )

                  P.S. So this is along the lines I was thinking and I'd like to hear thoughts on why this type of tech should not be considered. Like perhaps, if the mission were subject to some big EMP that killed all the electronics, in which case one would think any prospect of continuing would be pretty grim anyway.
                  This is one of the Citizen eco-drive chronos. It's made from toughened titanium has a sapphire crystal, 5 year battery life in total darkness, is accurate to +/- 5 seconds a month without the satellite-wave technology, time can be set manually, up to 40 time zones, multiple chrono funtions and 200m WR, so one imagines it should be okay to keep out the dust for EVA.


                  Screen Shot 2019-10-05 at 6.26.16 AM.png
                  Last edited by Tim.; 10-04-2019, 10:14 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Maybe I'm not forward thinking enough but cant seem to wrap my head around how traveling to other planets will help mankind? Think the money would be better spent on cleaning up the planet, ensuring a clean food supply and cleaning up the space junk thats currently orbiting the earth. I think space, rockets etc. are cool, my sons nursery is Ziggy Stardust/space themed but the reality of it makes no sense to me. Not even going to touch the whole war thing except to say its a tragic waste of life and am thankful that I never had to see and face combat during my time in the Marines.

                    Regards,

                    Ren

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Ren:

                      You cannot test new concepts for deep space technologies here on earth, so we need to push outside of the earths gravitational field to do this. Things like the VASIMR engine would really help considerably in this area. If we could get a ship built with a nuclear reactor and VASIMR, we could see at least space travel within our own solar system, possibly leading to the discovery of other elements we don't have here on earth that could lead to other new discoveries.

                      Cleaning up the planet: If the governments of every nation took action and made the companies such as Exxon, BP, Texaco, and the rest of 'big oil' companies responsible for real cleanup, we would not have to foot the bill. The BP incident was a real catastrophe, and yet it was a whole smoke and mirrors 'cleanup'. There was no cleanup, they dumped an even more toxic chemical called COREXIT on the crude in the water, essentially causing the crude oil to sink to the bottom of the gulf. It's still there. BP should have been made to go and actually clean the water of the crude, but they weren't and used even more chemicals. Big oil is responsible for so much of the pollution, and yet they have not been forced to clean up after themselves.

                      Clean food supply: The government is the problem behind that. Our government constantly pushes off things such as genetically modified organism (GMO) frankenfood as 'safe', while the whole of Europe has banned it. A member of my family developed an autoimmune disorder because of GMO 'food', but after cutting out GMO as much as 95% over a 2 year period, the disorder went away. This person switched from processed food and so forth to as much as possible of an Organic diet. All the disorders and allergies one sees today is because of scientists messing about with the food supply. Gluten issues have come about directly because of this - read the book "Wheat Belly" and it will fully explain the gluten intolerances of a lot of todays people. I am now growing most of my own vegetables from heirloom seeds, using no pesticides, just growing. I over plant to accomodate for crop loss. I use a special covering on the dirt to keep the weeds down, and it also has shown to keep pests down as well. You would be amazed at how much food you can grow in a small space from just a few packets of heirloom seeds. I think I got around 400 cucumbers out of two rows I planted. I know I have harvested around 10 gallons of pole beans, and more are ready to be picked - also two rows. I still have swiss chard out there to get, a couple of pumpkins, and a few rows of carrots. It's a little bit of work, but I know what I am eating and it cuts my grocery bill considerably.


                      Tim:

                      APOLLO 12 was struck by lightning a couple of times when leaving the earth. Luckily they had backup systems and got everything back online pretty quickly and so forth. They seemed worried that maybe the parachute system might be damaged (they didn't tell the Astronauts this), but it worked fine upon return. I would think that since the Saturn V with the rest of the systems were not grounded that it would be ok - like Tesla sitting on top of a piece of wood with ceramic feet insulated from ground with millions of volts running through him scenerio... As to the watch, if may still be an issue with EMP since it is an electronic watch, though that looks like a good candidate with all the features. A friend of mines dad when I was younger had a Seiko just like that and he was a pilot.
                      TKite,
                      Hydronaut

                      I need a new watch

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Ren,

                        First let me welcome you back and say I enjoyed your post. It fits right in with the free and easy open ended discussion this place encourages.

                        Second, I'll disagree, although not with the idea of war being a waste. Thing about a war is that it's like sex. It takes two to have the real thing. Some situations may vary. In any case, there has to be a reason for conflict and as far as I'm concerned it had better be damn good. I'm not going further, because I'll violate the rule against politics if I do, however I will say that of the two wars i have in my logbook, both had very complicated pluses and minuses regarding reasons. Nothing is really black or white.

                        Right now, I haven't time to go into things like love of the earth and space exploration. Later on in different posts.

                        See ya,

                        George
                        Cardigan American Princess Celeste says, "It's too quiet. You guys get up off your butts and start doing things."

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I agree. We need to get our own house (s) in order, before we go off in search
                          of new planets to abuse.
                          "So Many Watches / So Little Time"

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Hadn't looked back on this topic for a while. First, T. I like your wristwatch choices, though as said elsewhere the Rollie is on the pricey side. Second, wars have been fought for some really d*mned stupid reasons. In fact d*mned stupid reasons and war are a far more frequent correlation, than good reasons and war. That said, there have been some good reasons for war. Third, fascinated as I am about space, I understand wanting to do something first on Earth where we can have some effect before we go elsewhere. More space exploration might lead us to conclude we know far less than we think. Deflating hubris is never bad.

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                            • #29
                              Thanks George, and thank you for your service and thank your son for his service as well.

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