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  • New arrival

    I set a personal goal recently and, self-indulgently, promised myself a small watch purchase as an incentive to reach it. Goal was achieved this morning and this arrived in the letterbox this afternoon.

    The only other Chinese watch that I have owned was one of the very first Christopher Ward Malverns from about ten years ago. The Malverns were produced in Hong Kong and I thought mine was great for $175. This one cost only about two thirds as much at $110 delivered and it is also pretty impressive.

    The fact that it is a copy doesn't bother me. I tend to think of it the same as Seiko copying the Rolex datejust or Frederique Constant copying Chopard. In any case, my first automatic was an Invicta 8926 so, clearly, I have form.

    It arrived after 11 days from Tianjin. It measures 38mm by 9mm. The dial is argent and the sub-dial has an attractive shimmer.



    No one seems to like the strap and it does feel oddly like plastic. I'll never use it.



    I was concerned that this style wouldn't sit well on the wrist but I needn't have been. It hugs the wrist very well.



    With drilled lugs spaced 20mm apart it invites strap changes aplenty. Thin flat straps seem to suit it best.
    DavidM1

  • #2
    My first purchase after (re)discovering watches in 2013 was the Rodina identical to that. I got plenty of wear out of it before I had had enough of it. I then sold it to a friend for about half of what I paid, so the whole experience cost me 40. 40 well spent I recall finding the accuracy quite impressive for the money (within 10s/d iirc)

    rod aug 1.JPG
    Last edited by Der Amf; 06-10-2016, 01:51 PM.
    Always eager to hear more

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    • #3
      Congratulations on meeting the goal!

      The history of that dial is so old and so many manufacturers used that dial that I don't know if anyone knows the identity of the original designer. Certain modern makers have made a reputation for similar dials, but I wouldn't say that anyone actually has any claim to ownership over the design. You can check out Stowa's new book for examples of similar designs used by a couple watchmakers in the 1930s.

      Enjoy your reward!
      -Brian

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      • #4
        Originally posted by FuzzyB View Post
        Congratulations on meeting the goal!

        The history of that dial is so old and so many manufacturers used that dial that I don't know if anyone knows the identity of the original designer. Certain modern makers have made a reputation for similar dials, but I wouldn't say that anyone actually has any claim to ownership over the design. You can check out Stowa's new book for examples of similar designs used by a couple watchmakers in the 1930s.

        Enjoy your reward!
        I came pretty close to winning a fairly crappy mid-30s Stowa with that dial. I think maybe everything is a copy of Lange, but so many came out virtually within weeks of each other, it is pretty tough to say.
        Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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        • #5
          I once did some measurements, and came to the conclusion that not only the dial, but all the whole of it, lugs, case and dial, is modelled as closely as possible on the Nomos Tangomat (which is the automatic version of the Tangente) The only real difference is that the Chinese version is obliged to be about 1mm thicker.

          I once read a fascinating bit of info on watchesbysjx - "they noted that the wide availability of counterfeit watches made the real thing even more desirable, because a real watch and its equivalent counterfeit could be gifted together, with the replica used as proof of innocence during an investigation." In other words, the fakes Nomoi weren't be used to defraud customers, but the Chinese government's anti-corruption efforts

          Since the the Rider/Rodina is so closely modelled on the Tangomat, I think it would need wilful naivety to think that the manufacture of the parts of the legitimate watch isn't related in some way to that of the counterfeint (at one stage another Rodina model appeared with casebacks marked "Stowa" which made me a little queasy) But as been said lots of times, with the dial and the case design going back so far, that one can't claim that any kind of intellectual infringement at all is going on.

          Last edited by Der Amf; 06-10-2016, 05:11 PM.
          Always eager to hear more

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          • #6
            I have also seen the Chinese fakes with Nomos casebacks too. I am not sure that in either case, no pun intended, that is enough to conclude some kind of relation to the legitimate manufacturers. I am not saying I know either way but the Chinese make direct copies of things all the time.
            Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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            • #7
              The whole look is Bauhaus inspired, which means it dates back to the very early 1930's. I love the clean , elegant, non-adorned style.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, it is all very little money in watch terms. I don't know how long I'll have it but it fills a bit of a gap at the moment.
                DavidM1

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                • #9
                  Thanks Brian. I'm not sure if it was an incentive or just an excuse. I haven't bought a watch for years.
                  DavidM1

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                  • #10
                    Oh yes. I don't think there is any doubt what they are copying. It is very close to a tangente/ tangomat. Slightly nicer font as it happens. Eventually all design enters the public domain for the benefit of all. The question is mainly about when and whether perceived rights can be enforced.
                    DavidM1

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Henry Krinkle View Post
                      I have also seen the Chinese fakes with Nomos casebacks too. I am not sure that in either case, no pun intended, that is enough to conclude some kind of relation to the legitimate manufacturers. I am not saying I know either way but the Chinese make direct copies of things all the time.
                      I was careful in my wording, to differentiate between the manufacturers of the watch, and the manufacturers of the parts used.
                      Always eager to hear more

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                      • #12
                        Thanks. It's the first watch I've had in this style and it works well. Very legible too.
                        DavidM1

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DavidM1 View Post
                          Thanks. It's the first watch I've had in this style and it works well. Very legible too.

                          And sorry David- Yes, there is a reason this style of watch has been made off and on since 1927 by dozens of manufacturers. It is truly a classic piece of watch design. It's so perfect I nearly sold my Stowa, as I have a bit of a thing for "quirky" and it took me a while to connect to the perfection. Enjoy it!
                          Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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                          • #14
                            Thanks Henry. Yes, simplicity can be disarming. If it lacks character it gets dull quickly but sometimes they nail it.
                            DavidM1

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DavidM1 View Post
                              Thanks Henry. Yes, simplicity can be disarming. If it lacks character it gets dull quickly but sometimes they nail it.
                              I thought they got the texture of the dial just - nice and clear, but with depth, too.

                              ps good choice, going for the Rider rather than the Rodina - the font used is far more appropriate for the style of the design. As time went by, the Times New Roman (Bold) of "RODINA AUTOMATIC" stuck out more and more on the Bauhaus dial
                              Last edited by Der Amf; 06-11-2016, 02:53 AM.
                              Always eager to hear more

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