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Where would the Longines calibre 6942 rank?

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  • Where would the Longines calibre 6942 rank?

    I just saw a tempting little Longines come up for sale. The movement is the manual wind 6942. Early to mid seventies.



    Central seconds
    28,800
    3.85mm
    40 hours PR
    17 jewels
    Kif-Flector shock
    Micrometer regulator
    and interestingly the hacking lets the second hand return to zero before stopping. I wish I knew the proper name for that function. I wish that the handful of movements that survived the quartz crisis had had that function.

    I was wondering what movements of a similar spec that Longines were making at that time were more refined (thinner, better regulator etc)
    Last edited by Der Amf; 04-11-2016, 03:51 AM.
    Always eager to hear more

  • #2
    The watch itself is very me:



    I like the radial brushing of the case

    Always eager to hear more

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    • #3
      Love it.
      DavidM1

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      • #4
        My understanding is that Longines had a higher reputation pre-crisis, than it does now. Swatch group is currently offering Longines with variations of existing ETA ebauches that are not available to other brands in the Swatch Group. Some of these, such as the full retrograde calendars and column-wheel chronographs are pretty serious.

        My feeling is that they are trying to take the brand upmarket again.

        ps. I think the so-called 'Quartz Crisis' is an oft used but frightful misnomer. The Swiss watch industry suffered a crisis of inertia and intractability more than anything else. It almost exactly parallels what happened to Kodak. Elmar Mock (co-inventor of the Swatch) uses the term 'arrogance' when discussing the Swiss attitude to market conditions at the time of the crisis, and does so correctly in my opinion.
        Last edited by FSM71; 04-11-2016, 07:25 AM.

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        • #5
          I know that Longines movements could be happily compared to Omega, but I'm a bit unsure of the hierarchy within their range late sixties, early seventies. I wish Ranfft would give a bit more editorial commentary (all the info I've given here I got from the Ranfft page)
          Always eager to hear more

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          • #6
            It's not a movement I am familiar with, but it reminds me at a glance of a Certina movement I posted here a month or two ago:


            The Certina is mid-1960s, so perhaps npot as modern as the Longines.

            I don't see a fine regulation mechanism on that Longines--am I missing something? Oh wait--I looked on Dr. Ranfft's site:

            It appears there is a small +/- adjusting screw on that protruberance at 9:30.

            In the 1970s, Longines was still pushing the envelope, trying to develop thin, accurate mechanical movements. An example is the very thin automatic caliber L.990, about which I wrote in this article.

            There was a manual-wind version of the 990, which is not as wide and more than 1mm thinner than the 6942, but also is not as pretty. This is usually the case, IMO, for manual-wind versions of automatic movements. Something about them is too industrial, almost cynically so, for them to be considered pretty.

            http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...Longines_998_2
            Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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            • #7
              In light of all that, might one characterise this 6942 as an attractively designed movement that was up to date, without being at all cutting edge - ie nicely middle-range?

              Btw the family of movements also had versions with date (quickset) with day, without seconds, with small seconds etc If you want to Google, more comes up looking for the version with date, 6952.

              Here's a photo of a 9k watch with the 6952, same size case, similar dial

              Last edited by Der Amf; 04-11-2016, 10:20 AM.
              Always eager to hear more

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Der Amf View Post
                In light of all that, might one characterise this 6942 as an attractively designed movement that was up to date, without being at all cutting edge - ie nicely middle-range?
                That sounds reasonable. I think a lot of those watches are really sharp...and would consider Longines among the best available watches of that time. So many other brands had stopped making their own movements. Kudos to Longines for retaining their innovative and independent spirit for so long. I'm glad to see them renewing it with some proprietary calibers (despite the incumbent expense of their products!).
                Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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                • #9
                  Think I'm going to pass on the watch. The T lume looks like it needs sorting on both the dial and the hands, and it hasn't been serviced. 34mm is doable for me but I would much rather 36mm, and finally I'm finding this shot of the area around the crown a bit alarming:



                  Perhaps it's just dirt and shadows.
                  Always eager to hear more

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Der Amf View Post
                    Think I'm going to pass on the watch. The T lume looks like it needs sorting on both the dial and the hands, and it hasn't been serviced. 34mm is doable for me but I would much rather 36mm, and finally I'm finding this shot of the area around the crown a bit alarming:



                    Perhaps it's just dirt and shadows.
                    For the age it looks to be in fine shape. I'll bet you are correct on the dirt and shadows. You just about can't find a watch of the same age that has much in the way of lume. It seems to be about the first to go on a dial face.

                    When you find the perfect dial face look for a re-dial or else it really is a NOS watch.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Woodlands1 View Post
                      For the age it looks to be in fine shape. I'll bet you are correct on the dirt and shadows. You just about can't find a watch of the same age that has much in the way of lume. It seems to be about the first to go on a dial face.

                      When you find the perfect dial face look for a re-dial or else it really is a NOS watch.
                      Sorry what I meant about the lume was that on the hands it's in rather a mess; I don't mind dead lume, I've plenty of that, but on the hands of this it's looking rather tired and patchy.

                      I might email the dealer asking if the weirdness around the crown is just dirt, and also asking about the dial texture: it looks a fairly plain matte white, but he's listed it as silver.
                      Last edited by Der Amf; 04-12-2016, 04:02 AM.
                      Always eager to hear more

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                      • #12
                        Dealer replied with more photos. He says yes it was just dirt on the case...though that little patch immediately to the left of the crown is still giving me the fear:



                        The hands look stable - dirty rather than crumbling away?





                        The face is a very white version of the usual silvery dial. Blanched matte silver?

                        Always eager to hear more

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Der Amf View Post
                          The face is a very white version of the usual silvery dial. Blanched matte silver?
                          Our language has possessed, for centuries, a perfectly good one-word description for this very thing. We rarely use it, for some reason.
                          "Argent"

                          http://www.dictionary.com/browse/argent?s=t

                          Hold your head up.
                          Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
                            Our language has possessed, for centuries, a perfectly good one-word description for this very thing. We rarely use it, for some reason.
                            "Argent"

                            http://www.dictionary.com/browse/argent?s=t

                            Hold your head up.
                            Fantastic ��

                            Do you fancy risking an opinion on the stability of that lume on them there hands?
                            Always eager to hear more

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                            • #15
                              It's now incoming
                              Always eager to hear more

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