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$383,000... and it is missing its bezel?!?.....

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  • $383,000... and it is missing its bezel?!?.....

    ...1967 Rolex Ref 1665 “Single-Red” Sea-Dweller which sold for a whopping $383,000. The pre-sale estimate on this piece was a mere $60,000-$80,000, but it seems that collector’s could not resist the provenance of this piece. And who could blame them — this Single-Red Sea-Dweller was also “Single-Owner” (since 1967), the property of a an accomplished American Navy diver. The “original owner” status along with the relative rarity of the Single-Red Sea-Dweller in all its ‘character’ made this piece highly coveted — a superb collector’s catch in today’s world of high-dollar collecting...


  • #2
    Just think how many great watches you could get for $400K.
    Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Henry Krinkle View Post
      Just think how many great watches you could get for $400K.
      And have $350k left over.

      Rolex collectors are the oddest group. Who else is willing to pay a premium for something so beat up? The worst part of it is that some of that "character" could be so easily cleaned up and the watch made wearable again. Somehow, I doubt this watch will ever be serviced or worn again.
      -Brian

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      • #4
        Cool Watch .......

        and i know some people will say that something's worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, but this is a good example of WHY I stopped collecting high-end mechanicals. Here we have a basic 'sports' watch from its day selling for an obscene premium with a 'story' attached. I have to admit I got caught up in all of this until I looked in the safe one day and really questioned my own sanity.

        Anyway, happiness doesn't come with a price tag. I've been happier and more content buying whatever 'hits my
        fancy' and be damned with collector value or the accepted status-quo.

        Enjoy your watches ........ (because you really like them).

        :@)

        Kurt
        "So Many Watches / So Little Time"

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        • #5
          I agree 100%. I buy my watches to wear them.
          Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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          • #6
            Yeah, I was trying to think myself up to $100K worth of watches and couldn't get anywhere close to that.
            Solve all your doubts through question mode.

            Comment


            • #7
              Well I agree but these guys buy for investment and it appears to work with some watches. Kurt, as I recall you made money on your pateks etc. Me, I dont have the coin to risk it but if I did- I think I could make money- heck- buy a new patek today and its likely to make you money- as much as other investments- who knows- but it will make money if its somewhat special now




              Originally posted by kurt48 View Post
              and i know some people will say that something's worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, but this is a good example of WHY I stopped collecting high-end mechanicals. Here we have a basic 'sports' watch from its day selling for an obscene premium with a 'story' attached. I have to admit I got caught up in all of this until I looked in the safe one day and really questioned my own sanity.

              Anyway, happiness doesn't come with a price tag. I've been happier and more content buying whatever 'hits my
              fancy' and be damned with collector value or the accepted status-quo.

              Enjoy your watches ........ (because you really like them).

              :@)

              Kurt

              Comment


              • #8
                To me its not about whether I made money (and I did on 2 Pateks and 1 Lange). It's more about putting
                a hobby/passion beyond the reach (as you just said) of most of the people that love watches.

                It's one thing when a Platinum Doublesplit sells for north of 75K, but a Rolex diver that was probably
                less than 1K when new ??? I bought my first stainless and gold GMT from BB&B (Baileys) and paid full
                retail. It was $900.00 in 1978. My wife almost fainted in the mall when I bought it. As a result of the
                image Rolex took on in the high-profile 80's, I won't wear one today.

                It's not just watches, we live in a very conspicuously material society, where all desirable objects (Watches,
                Cars, Clothing etc.) have skyrocketed in price, reflecting something more, maybe insidiously more, than their
                intrinsic value.

                To me its endemic of an even bigger problem ... the disappearance of a true 'middle class.' I just
                decided not to give them any more of my money and follow my heart !

                There was a time (a long time) when I couldn't say no to the latest Basel Anachronism, but not any more.
                Now it's actually fun to walk through Tourneau or Cartier at the KOP Mall and not lust for anything I see.

                Your mileage will probably vary.

                :@)

                Kurt
                "So Many Watches / So Little Time"

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                • #9
                  I understand the minds of these collectors. When I received the Citizen dive watch (51-2273) from a retired Army Major, it was a plain watch to me, until I heard his story. I shared this story with Brandon in my e-mail to him, but I don't remember if I ever posted it in this forum. This watch prompted me to post the thread: Miyota 8200-The Ultimate Workhorse? more than a year back. What compelled me? It's not due to the last sentence I wrote in the thread, but due to the Major's story.

                  Who cares? Who would give a damn? But I have seen clearly through the person and through this underrated dive watch. And on its badly scratched crystal, which at a certain point became like a television screen while the Major was relating his story, have drawn me to understand its importance to the person. When the first person who owned it was talking directly to you and begged you to take care of it, it seems the story is already etched on the watch. Whenever I look at its scratches, and oftentimes thought of polishing them away for it to become presentable, as if something is telling me I'd be polishing the spirit away.

                  IMO, that kind of provenance makes a simple, non-interesting watch, a priceless piece of treasure and not limited to certain amount. It has a better provenance than a dive watch venerated due to its prestigious name and not the story behind it, to bait $300K.
                  Tempus fugit...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tulips guys, tulips.

                    It's a very nice bubble waiting to pop.

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