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  • Rotating Anchor

    I am sure that some of you will have seen this on Hodinkee already but it was something that I hadn't read before....



    ".....Rado name at 12, with the trademark anchor logo that spins as your wrist moves. I had a recent discussion with a friend about this "feature," that has been on Rados since way back. He had heard that the spinning anchor was an indicator of service intervals for the watch: when it stopped spinning freely, it was time for a movement service. I hadnít heard this before and checked with Rado, who confirmed that, historically, the anchor was mounted on a lubricated ruby bearing behind the dial and, when the oil there ran dry and it stopped moving easily, it would be a sign that the movementís oils need refreshing. Rado even held a Swiss patent on this feature."



    Full article / Captain Cook MK2 Review here -- https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/ra...mk-ii-hands-on

  • #2
    Indeed, it's known. Rado used to claim the anchor was a service indicator.
    Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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    • #3
      It only works if your watchmaker remembers to lubricate the anchor though, I know mine doesn't.

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      • #4
        Had no idea about this. All I know is that I'm a sucker for small details like the red spinning anchor. It was one small detail which endeared me to the LE Captain Cook 37mm model, which I never did end up getting though. They have one in stock at the local Nordstrom, and I take a look at it every time I pass by.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by FUTURA View Post
          I am sure that some of you will have seen this on Hodinkee already but it was something that I hadn't read before....

          ".....Rado name at 12, with the trademark anchor logo that spins as your wrist moves. I had a recent discussion with a friend about this "feature," that has been on Rados since way back. He had heard that the spinning anchor was an indicator of service intervals for the watch: when it stopped spinning freely, it was time for a movement service. I hadnít heard this before and checked with Rado, who confirmed that, historically, the anchor was mounted on a lubricated ruby bearing behind the dial and, when the oil there ran dry and it stopped moving easily, it would be a sign that the movementís oils need refreshing. Rado even held a Swiss patent on this feature."

          Full article / Captain Cook MK2 Review here -- https://www.hodinkee.com/articles/ra...mk-ii-hands-on
          In 2002 I published an article that described the anchor, though I do not believe I mentioned it was intended as a service indicator. There was a common misconception some time ago (perhaps there still is) that the anchor was powered by the watch. In my awareness, that is only true of the very rare automatic chronograph introduced in 1974.

          Details on both of these topics here:
          www.watchcarefully.com/articles/rado1.html
          www.watchcarefully.com/articles/rado2.html


          Image from the original Rado patent application:

          Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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