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Well, at least it's a start- Non-Rado watch content.

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  • Well, at least it's a start- Non-Rado watch content.

    The older members here will remember that I had a break-in quite a few years ago now. Amongst other things I lost 10 or eleven of my first dozen Rados, my very first Louis Rossel and most importantly this:

    gruen v-thin.jpg

    This was Mrs K's Dad's watch. He bought it after graduating from the BATCP. He got a brief furlow after that and returned to his hometown to marry Mrs K's Mom. During this time he bought the Gruen. It went to Britain with him, where they both completed two and a half tours in Wellingtons and Lancasters. Mrs. K's Dad won the DFC during this time.

    Back to the watch- even when there was a Gruen watch forum the best they could do is tell me what Horst told me when I had him fix the watch (When I found it it had no crystal and was not running at all.) So the only information I had, was something we sort of knew anyway. The movement dated it to 1940/41. Yesterday on a vintage page on facebook one of the fellows posted this.

    Gruen.jpg

    Top left corner, Gruen's "navy" watch. The Lexington, presumably named after Gruen's Lexington Avenue office. One can only guess, but it even looks like the suspicious crown is likely orginal.

    It doesn't really help me that much as I have never seen another example, but I'll take what I can get. Even a name is more than I had.
    Last edited by Henry Krinkle; 01-09-2018, 01:32 PM.
    Solve all your doubts through question mode.

  • #2
    Fascinating advert, Hank.
    It's sad to be reminded that you lost those pieces.
    If a suitable example of the Lexington case available, are you seeking to buy?

    On a snarky note: how many aviators do you think bought that Airport model? It hardly seems to fit the bill.
    And the poor Coast Guard...a vital home defense service, left out of the equation entirely!
    Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

    Comment


    • #3
      I would like to replace it. I look sporadically. I have seen a couple of the army models. There is one up now, but I have never come across another Lexington.

      In answer to the question about the airport I think the fact my Father-in-Law bought the navy watch to fly with speaks volumes.
      Solve all your doubts through question mode.

      Comment


      • #4
        Henry, thats a fab story behind the watch.
        I saw one of the last flying Avro Lancasters doing a fly-past with Hurricanes and Spitfires over Elvington Airfield ( an hour from me) a couple of years back.
        I actually saw the very advert that you have included today as part of my research a couple of weeks ago and I cant think how I ended up seeing it , but i remember it, perhaps when skimming through vintage watch adverts.
        I hope that you can find a replacement .
        Last edited by Grantag; 01-09-2018, 03:46 PM.

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        • #5
          Hi Henry, great family background story to this one and I sincerely hope you find one to replace the one that belonged to your father in law. I will keep an eye out and PM you with any finds as I'm sure the other members will. In the meanwhile I found the following site which you may already have seen but just in case: Site , here's a translation of the veri thin section.

          1938-1957, Gruen Veri-Thin Wrist Watch
          Pocket watches with the name VeriThin (initially without hyphen), which had a particularly flat movement, were launched in 1904 and revolutionized the design of pocket watches at that time by allowing shallower and smaller designs with the same precision of the clockworks. A similar success also reached the Veri-Thin wristwatches, which were first presented to the public in the spring of 1939, experienced their heyday in the 1940s and were still occasionally built until 1957. The small compact design of men's wristwatches does not match the current trend for large watches, which is why collectors can still buy these watches quite cheaply. The Veri-Thin model range of all Gruen watches probably has the largest variety of models. Best known are the Pan American watches with a 24-hour label and 420SS movement.
          The dial of the watches is usually denoted by Gruen Veri-Thin possibly with the addition Precision. The movement is round, tank or pillow-shaped and has a ratchet wheel, which bears the inscription "VERI-THIN PATENTED". Only in the movements 411C, 415, 416, 422, 422SS, 422R, 422RSS and 423 this designation is missing, which is why they are also called the "fake" Veri-Thins. In the case of the latter watches, the term "Veri-Thin" is sometimes missing on the dial.
          The men's movements of the Veri-Thin series started in 1938/1939 with the clockwork models 405 and 406 and end with the first sold in 1948 movement model 435, which was built until 1957, so almost to the cessation of production in Cincinnatti. Watches of the Veri Thin series are available with the following movements for ladies: 210, 210SS, 211, 211SS, 212, 215, 215SS, 216, 216SS, 270, 270SS, 271, 271SS, 272, 380, 381, 385, 386
          and in men: 405, 405SS, 406, 406SS, 410, 410SS, 411, 411C, 415, 415R, 416, 417, 420, 420SS, 421, 421SS, 422, 422R, 422RSS, 422SS, 423, 425, 425SS, 426, 430, 431, 435.

          Also there's a link to this site that seems to have everything Gruen in English. http://www.gruenwristwatches.com.

          And this was on the Bay.

          s-l1600-10.jpg

          Haven't found your watch yet but I'm sure it's out there......
          Last edited by Tim.; 01-10-2018, 01:18 AM.

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          • #6
            Good work Tim, I did some digging around from this end whilst you were smoking the keyboard at your end.

            I contacted a chap in the states who specialises in vintage Gruen watches. He says that the Lexington model is particularly hard to get hold of.

            Henry I found your Father-In-Law's watch on this advert. Sorry that its a low quality image , but the Lexington is there.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by Grantag; 01-10-2018, 01:52 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Tim. View Post
              Hi Henry, great family background story to this one and I sincerely hope you find one to replace the one that belonged to your father in law. I will keep an eye out and PM you with any finds as I'm sure the other members will. In the meanwhile I found the following site which you may already have seen but just in case: Site , here's a translation of the veri thin section.

              1938-1957, Gruen Veri-Thin Wrist Watch
              Pocket watches with the name VeriThin (initially without hyphen), which had a particularly flat movement, were launched in 1904 and revolutionized the design of pocket watches at that time by allowing shallower and smaller designs with the same precision of the clockworks. A similar success also reached the Veri-Thin wristwatches, which were first presented to the public in the spring of 1939, experienced their heyday in the 1940s and were still occasionally built until 1957. The small compact design of men's wristwatches does not match the current trend for large watches, which is why collectors can still buy these watches quite cheaply. The Veri-Thin model range of all Gruen watches probably has the largest variety of models. Best known are the Pan American watches with a 24-hour label and 420SS movement.
              The dial of the watches is usually denoted by Gruen Veri-Thin possibly with the addition Precision. The movement is round, tank or pillow-shaped and has a ratchet wheel, which bears the inscription "VERI-THIN PATENTED". Only in the movements 411C, 415, 416, 422, 422SS, 422R, 422RSS and 423 this designation is missing, which is why they are also called the "fake" Veri-Thins. In the case of the latter watches, the term "Veri-Thin" is sometimes missing on the dial.
              The men's movements of the Veri-Thin series started in 1938/1939 with the clockwork models 405 and 406 and end with the first sold in 1948 movement model 435, which was built until 1957, so almost to the cessation of production in Cincinnatti. Watches of the Veri Thin series are available with the following movements for ladies: 210, 210SS, 211, 211SS, 212, 215, 215SS, 216, 216SS, 270, 270SS, 271, 271SS, 272, 380, 381, 385, 386
              and in men: 405, 405SS, 406, 406SS, 410, 410SS, 411, 411C, 415, 415R, 416, 417, 420, 420SS, 421, 421SS, 422, 422R, 422RSS, 422SS, 423, 425, 425SS, 426, 430, 431, 435.

              Also there's a link to this site that seems to have everything Gruen in English. http://www.gruenwristwatches.com.

              And this was on the Bay.


              Haven't found your watch yet but I'm sure it's out there......
              Thanks Tim. I had seen that site. Before I joined EoT I was a member of the previous iteration of the Gruen forum.
              Solve all your doubts through question mode.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Grantag View Post
                Good work Tim, I did some digging around from this end whilst you were smoking the keyboard at your end.

                I contacted a chap in the states who specialises in vintage Gruen watches. He says that the Lexington model is particularly hard to get hold of.

                Henry I found your Father-In-Law's watch on this advert. Sorry that its a low quality image , but the Lexington is there.
                I had found that ad in an online PDF of a Life magazine. Believe me, I know the Lexington is hard to find. 8 years of sporadic searching has reulted in nothing.

                No other Gruen model has spoken to me. I've bought a few similar in the past. Curiously the watch that speaks most to me that isn't a Lexington is the Stowa Partitio. I have considered buying one of them for years.
                Solve all your doubts through question mode.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is my favourite of my current Gruens, but it is really too flashy.

                  P1018740a_zps79230247.jpg

                  It dates from 1955 and that is the factory expansion bracelet for it. This is currently my oldest wristwatch.
                  Solve all your doubts through question mode.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Gripping story Henry, you can be assured that we'll all be looking out for one of these for you.
                    http://s145.photobucket.com/user/sco...deshow/Watches

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                    • #11
                      seconded

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