Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A project chronometer arrives...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A project chronometer arrives...

    The uncased Mk I 56-H Chronometre, bought from Germany on my behalf by a friend in England, has finally completed its multi-legged journey to my workbench.

    It looks great--runs pretty well, and is decidedly rare. Unfortunately, finding a proper 56-H case or even the case back, will be nigh on impossible. Still, it deserves to be revived, if not exactly to original specifications.

    I've got a few things to take care of before I can take a screwdriver to this, but I am excited to see whether it fits a case I have ready to receive it. Wish me luck!


    Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

  • #2
    A request:
    The outside diameter of this dial and movement ring is roughly 29.9mm.
    The spare 1960s-era Rado case pictured above has an inside diameter of about 28mm, so I cannot use it for this purpose.
    I'd be glad to consider a trade or to purchase a case which will fit this movement...steel or gold-plated.

    Could you chaps check your parts inventory for me OR recommend a specific vintage model which has the inside diameter I require, so I can begin a search for a parts watch?


    Cheers!
    Brad
    Last edited by Watch Carefully; 12-07-2017, 04:37 PM.
    Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

    Comment


    • #3
      Brad you can rebuild him.... You have the technology.... You have the capability to make the world's finest watch.... A Mk I 56-H Chronometre will be that watch..... Better than it was before.... Better...stronger...faster.....

      Comment


      • #4
        Congratulations Brad and good luck putting it together.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Grantag View Post
          Brad you can rebuild him.... You have the technology.... You have the capability to make the world's finest watch.... A Mk I 56-H Chronometre will be that watch..... Better than it was before.... Better...stronger...faster.....
          Sounds like the Six Million Dollar Watch..

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by JOSE G View Post
            Sounds like the Six Million Dollar Watch..
            Yayyy Jose ! that's exactly what it is

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Grantag View Post
              Brad you can rebuild him.... You have the technology.... You have the capability to make the world's finest watch.... A Mk I 56-H Chronometre will be that watch..... Better than it was before.... Better...stronger...faster.....
              The Steve Austin of chronometers?
              I would prefer it not to be faster.
              Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

              Comment


              • #8
                56-H Chronometer variations, for reference

                A quick post of variations for comparison...

                Mk I 56-H (1957-1961) with italicised 'R' crown, no date, AS1361N
                Cased in 18k gold:

                Cased in 18k or gold-plate (needs verification):

                Note: the caseback below is an unverified variation:


                Note: this EOT thread includes images of gold-plated and 18k Mk I variants.

                Mk II 56-H (1962-1967) Ref. 11670 (re: Shawkey), with block 'R' crown, date, cyclops, AS1701
                Cased in steel:

                Cased in 18k gold:

                Cased in 18k or gold-plate (needs verification):


                Mk III Chronometer (1968-1972) Ref. 11821 with anchor crown, date, squared case lugs, AS1858 or AS1901
                Cased in steel:





                Image from Fritz Von Osterhausen's book Wristwatch Chronometers (Callwey Verlag, Munich, 1996).
                Last edited by Watch Carefully; 12-18-2017, 02:38 PM.
                Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've always liked those ones where Rado knicked the Chronometer logo from Mido. Of course, I like the Mido version too.
                  Solve all your doubts through question mode.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How's this for a quality wristwatch movement?



                    After 55-60 years of who-knows-what kind of treatment, and being shipped from Germany to England to the USA uncased, a slight adjustment has it running again like a chronometer!
                    Last edited by Watch Carefully; 12-15-2017, 04:40 PM.
                    Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
                      How's this for a quality wristwatch movement?



                      After 55-60 years of who-knows-what kind of treatment, and being shipped from Germany to England to the USA uncased, a slight adjustment has it running again like a chronometer!
                      Fantastic! Brad. What a great start to what should be a great watch for you. It's interesting, my President has the same crown as the MK1 with a bayonet case back like the MK11, only with seahorses not the shooting star. That leads me to another question, the answer to which I'm sure resides in the EoT archive somewhere. Was the model name 56-H coined to celebrate a newly discovered star?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Tim. View Post
                        Fantastic! Brad. What a great start to what should be a great watch for you. It's interesting, my President has the same crown as the MK1 with a bayonet case back like the MK11, only with seahorses not the shooting star. That leads me to another question, the answer to which I'm sure resides in the EoT archive somewhere. Was the model name 56-H coined to celebrate a newly discovered star?
                        Sadly, we have not discovered the meaning of the 56-H label.
                        Is that a typical star-name?
                        I surmised it had to do with Sputnik spending 56 hours in orbit in 1957 when the first Rado chronometers were issued.
                        I don't think anyone currently at Rado knows.
                        Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
                          Sadly, we have not discovered the meaning of the 56-H label.
                          Is that a typical star-name?
                          I surmised it had to do with Sputnik spending 56 hours in orbit in 1957 when the first Rado chronometers were issued.
                          I don't think anyone currently at Rado knows.
                          That must be it Brad, I hadn't thought of that. They've represented the Sputnik as a shooting star with a tail, which it certainly would have had on re-entry.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tim. View Post
                            That must be it Brad, I hadn't thought of that. They've represented the Sputnik as a shooting star with a tail, which it certainly would have had on re-entry.
                            Actually, it wasn't Sputnik...that satellite stayed up for a few months. I mis-remembered. There was something that set a 56-hour mark around that time.
                            Any other ideas??
                            Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
                              Actually, it wasn't Sputnik...that satellite stayed up for a few months. I mis-remembered. There was something that set a 56-hour mark around that time.
                              Any other ideas??
                              So far, the only space related incident I can find involving 56 hours is this: Apr. 11-17, 1970: The flight of Apollo 13 was one of the near disasters of the Apollo flight program. At 56 hours into the flight, an oxygen tank in the Apollo service module ruptured and damaged several of the power, electrical, and life support systems.
                              It's not late 50's and I don't think they'd be marking it by issuing a watch. I'll keep searching.

                              P.S. Found this, not a reference to 56 hours but a comet designated 'C' for comet. C/1956 R1 the first brilliant comet to be seen since Halley's in 1910. Is it possible the 'H' is a nod to Halley's? As in a 1956 version of Halley's, which wouldn't arrive again till 1986. It's a long bow to draw I know but it's all I can find that's related to space, 56 and a star like object with a tail.

                              COMET C/1956 R1 (AREND-ROLAND; O.S. 1957 III). Naked-eye visibility extended from mid-Mar. until mid-May; T = 1957 April 8. The first brilliant comet to be visible from the northern hemisphere since Halley's in 1910. Spotted nearly 6 months before perihelion passage as a tenth-magnitude object in Perseus. Moved toward the southwest. Observable only from the southern hemisphere in March and early April, rising steadily to first magnitude. During the latter half of April, seen from the Northern Hemisphere as an extraordinary object in the northwestern sky at the end of evening twilight. About April 15, the head was of zero magnitude, trailing a 25-30 degree tail. Between April 20 and May 3, the comet displayed a bright, sunward-pointing anti-tail up to 15 degrees long! At the conclusion of April, the brightness had fallen to third magnitude. The comet traversed Triangulum, Perseus, and entered Camelopardalus during this period. After the middle of May, when the comet had become a circumpolar object, it was finally lost to the unaided eye.
                              Last edited by Tim.; 12-16-2017, 06:01 PM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X