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  • #16
    Originally posted by Tim. View Post
    So far, the only space related incident I can find involving 56 hours is this: Apr. 11-17, 1970: The flight of Apollo 13 was one of the near disasters of the Apollo flight program. At 56 hours into the flight, an oxygen tank in the Apollo service module ruptured and damaged several of the power, electrical, and life support systems.
    It's not late 50's and I don't think they'd be marking it by issuing a watch. I'll keep searching.

    P.S. Found this, not a reference to 56 hours but a comet designated 'C' for comet. C/1956 R1 the first brilliant comet to be seen since Halley's in 1910. Is it possible the 'H' is a nod to Halley's? As in a 1956 version of Halley's, which wouldn't arrive again till 1986. It's a long bow to draw I know but it's all I can find that's related to space, 56 and a star like object with a tail.

    COMET C/1956 R1 (AREND-ROLAND; O.S. 1957 III). Naked-eye visibility extended from mid-Mar. until mid-May; T = 1957 April 8. The first brilliant comet to be visible from the northern hemisphere since Halley's in 1910. Spotted nearly 6 months before perihelion passage as a tenth-magnitude object in Perseus. Moved toward the southwest. Observable only from the southern hemisphere in March and early April, rising steadily to first magnitude. During the latter half of April, seen from the Northern Hemisphere as an extraordinary object in the northwestern sky at the end of evening twilight. About April 15, the head was of zero magnitude, trailing a 25-30 degree tail. Between April 20 and May 3, the comet displayed a bright, sunward-pointing anti-tail up to 15 degrees long! At the conclusion of April, the brightness had fallen to third magnitude. The comet traversed Triangulum, Perseus, and entered Camelopardalus during this period. After the middle of May, when the comet had become a circumpolar object, it was finally lost to the unaided eye.
    An excellent suggestion! I was just thinking, prior to reading your addendum, that it seems quite a coincidence that '57 was the first year of a model with 56 in the name.
    Was it only a coincidence, or does it refer to something specific to 1956 (and which, by the late 1960s, wasn't worthy of retaining the name in the Mk III chronometers)? Your post above leads me to think we're on the right track, though the H connection to Halley does not seem strong enough. For example C-56 or 56-C (for both comet and chronometer) would have made far more sense...unless the translation of 'comet' in French or German begins with an H (no, one is comète and the other, predictably, Komet).

    HOLD THE PRESSES...
    according to Wikipedia, regarding that comet:
    "As the eighth comet found in 1956, it was named Arend–Roland 1956h after its discoverers. "

    I think you nailed it, TIM!

    And there is more evidence:
    "During the April perihelion passage, the tail of the comet reached a length of 15° of arc. The appearance of the tail varied, with streamers on April 16 and May 5, and the tail splitting into three beams on the 29th. By April 22 the comet also displayed a prominent anomalous tail (or antitail) spanning 5°. This antitail stretched out to span 12° on April 25,[6] reaching its maximum extent. The antitail had disappeared by April 29."

    Three beams:
    Last edited by Watch Carefully; 12-21-2017, 10:59 AM.
    Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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    • #17
      That was some serious detective work!!!
      https://www.instagram.com/the_rado_collector/

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      • #18
        Originally posted by pecardoso View Post
        That was some serious detective work!!!

        How cool is this?:


        From a stamp chat board:
        "Comet Arend–Roland was discovered on November 8, 1956 by Belgian astronomers Sylvain Arend and Georges Roland. Here is an image of a stamp depicting the comet and a telescope, designed by Belgian artist Oscar Hector Bonnevalle (1920-1993), combined engraved by Constant Spinoy and photogravure, and issued by Belgium on May 28, 1966 to commemorate the tenth anniversary of the discovery and to publicize the Royal Observatory of Belgium, Scott No. 669."

        The question now arises:
        What was so important about comet Arend–Roland 1956h, that Rado felt compelled to honor it with a very special named model?
        This may require a message to RADO HQ in Lengnau, Switzerland.
        Or maybe I just need to read this book.

        Last edited by Watch Carefully; 12-21-2017, 04:25 PM.
        Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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        • #19
          After all these years, you finally have your answer.
          Solve all your doubts through question mode.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
            An excellent suggestion! I was just thinking, prior to reading your addendum, that it seems quite a coincidence that '57 was the first year of a model with 56 in the name.
            Was it only a coincidence, or does it refer to something specific to 1956 (and which, by the late 1960s, wasn't worthy of retaining the name in the Mk III chronometers)? Your post above leads me to think we're on the right track, though the H connection to Halley does not seem strong enough. For example C-56 or 56-C (for both comet and chronometer) would have made far more sense...unless the translation of 'comet' in French or German begins with an H (no, one is comète and the other, predictably, Komet).

            HOLD THE PRESSES...
            according to Wikipedia, regarding that comet:
            "As the eighth comet found in 1956, it was named Arend–Roland 1956h after its discoverers. "

            I think you nailed it, TIM!

            And there is more evidence:
            "During the April perihelion passage, the tail of the comet reached a length of 15° of arc. The appearance of the tail varied, with streamers on April 16 and May 5, and the tail splitting into three beams on the 29th. By April 22 the comet also displayed a prominent anomalous tail (or antitail) spanning 5°. This antitail stretched out to span 12° on April 25,[6] reaching its maximum extent. The antitail had disappeared by April 29."

            Three beams:
            Excellent! Great team work, glad to have been part of it. A little Christmas present for all the Radofiles out there!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Tim. View Post
              Excellent! Great team work, glad to have been part of it. A little Christmas present for all the Radofiles out there!
              Good work guys, another Rado mystery solved...
              http://s145.photobucket.com/user/sco...deshow/Watches

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
                The question now arises:
                What was so important about comet Arend–Roland 1956h, that Rado felt compelled to honor it with a very special named model?
                There may have been a number of contributing factors here. I think, at the time, society in general had an obsession with all things space related on both sides of the "Iron Curtain", this is the era of "Sputnik" . This was "The first brilliant comet to be visible from the northern hemisphere since Halley's in 1910." In the Northern Hemisphere they had sight of this comet with the naked eye for a full month from April 15 - May 15, so it must have caused quite a stir, particularly with the various antics produced by the tail. Also, I get a strong impression that whoever was steering the ship at Rado had a healthy obsession with the advancement of aeronautical technology and man's quest for space, it seems they were very attuned to being up to date with current events in the naming of models. Jetliner, StratoJet, Space Flight and Marstron to name but a few. So the naming of a watch to commemorate this comet probably sits well within that field of interest.
                Last edited by Tim.; 12-21-2017, 04:21 PM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Tim. View Post
                  Excellent! Great team work, glad to have been part of it. A little Christmas present for all the Radofiles out there!
                  I'm very excited, indeed.
                  If only I could revise my article on watchcarefully.com to include these details.
                  I may need to compile a small article on the Chronometer series (pre-DS1-E).
                  Thanks again for the help!
                  Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Tim. View Post
                    There may have been a number of contributing factors here. I think, at the time, society in general had an obsession with all things space related on both sides of the "Iron Curtain", this is the era of "Sputnik" . This was "The first brilliant comet to be visible from the northern hemisphere since Halley's in 1910." In the Northern Hemisphere they had sight of this comet with the naked eye for a full month from April 15 - May 15, so it must have caused quite a stir, particularly with the various antics produced by the tail. Also, I get a strong impression that whoever was steering the ship at Rado had a healthy obsession with the advancement of aeronautical technology and man's quest for space, it seems they were very attuned to being up to date with current events in the naming of models. Jetliner, StratoJet, Space Flight and Marstron to name but a few. So the naming of a watch to commemorate this comet probably sits well within that field of interest.
                    Again, I think you nailed it.
                    Also around this time, Rado marketed their Satellite mystery-dial watches (ostensibly in honor of sputnik):



                    This watch was also offered by other brands (Steelco, Helbros), so the 56-H may represent the first individual effort by Rado to commemorate a significant event/body in space...obviously the start of a long period of devotion to the cause (well described above).
                    Last edited by Watch Carefully; 12-21-2017, 04:35 PM.
                    Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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                    • #25
                      A nice place from which to discover a comet?:



                      And one of its famous visitors:



                      Last edited by Watch Carefully; 12-22-2017, 11:55 AM.
                      Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Watch Carefully View Post
                        A quick post of variations for comparison...

                        Mk I 56-H (1957-1961) with italicised 'R' crown, no date, AS1361N
                        Cased in 18k gold:

                        Cased in 18k or gold-plate (needs verification):

                        Note: the caseback below is an unverified variation:


                        Note: this EOT thread includes images of gold-plated and 18k Mk I variants.

                        Mk II 56-H (1962-1967) Ref. 11670 (re: Shawkey), with block 'R' crown, date, cyclops, AS1701
                        Cased in steel:

                        Cased in 18k gold:

                        Cased in 18k or gold-plate (needs verification):


                        Mk III Chronometer (1968-1972) Ref. 11821 with anchor crown, date, squared case lugs, AS1858 or AS1901
                        Cased in steel:





                        Image from Fritz Von Osterhausen's book Wristwatch Chronometers (Callwey Verlag, Munich, 1996).
                        Hi Brad!

                        I think the 56-H and 56-H B (what you call Mk II) are always 18 kt, not GP.
                        The one on the pics of "Webauktion24" surely has a replaced crystal.
                        Following information from Rado, the markers on the dial are also 18 kt.

                        https://www.r-l-x.de/forum/showthrea...1612-Rado-56-h
                        Best regards, Mike
                        vintage-rado.de

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by mike184 View Post
                          Hi Brad!

                          I think the 56-H and 56-H B (what you call Mk II) are always 18 kt, not GP.
                          The one on the pics of "Webauktion24" surely has a replaced crystal.
                          Following information from Rado, the markers on the dial are also 18 kt.

                          https://www.r-l-x.de/forum/showthrea...1612-Rado-56-h
                          Hi Mike,
                          Thanks for that challenge; I'm basing my assumption that a gold-plated model exists because of this pair of photos (taken from somewhere on the Web):



                          It is essentially my steel model with everything necessary to make a g-p variant. Initially I thought that the 18k models always had gold markers on gold dial (versus g-p models having gold markers on silver dial) but I do not think that is a consistent rule.
                          Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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                          • #28
                            Indeed, you´re right, that looks like a GP 56-H B.
                            Ever seen a second one?
                            Seems to be as rare as your SS one.

                            "Taken from somewhere on the Web" - with your copyright-mark?
                            Last edited by mike184; 01-11-2018, 04:42 PM.
                            Best regards, Mike
                            vintage-rado.de

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by mike184 View Post
                              "Taken from somewhere on the Web" - with your copyright-mark?
                              Rats--I need to learn how to remove that watermark from photos I have 'borrowed'.

                              Good job noticing the incorrect crystal on that other B model.

                              If you have any info you could share (or images/katalog) via e-mail, I'd be grateful. I am working up an article.
                              Cheers,
                              Brad
                              Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

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                              • #30
                                All I own is in the other thread.

                                The 56-H B was offered in Germany in 1962 with the 18 kt "extra-heavy" gold case only,
                                with leather strap or with the 18 kt-gold bracelet.
                                Interesting that you had the choice between a dial in gold or in silver - as on your SS one.

                                1962 Katalog 56 H.jpg

                                I think I´ve already sent you this pic in original size.
                                If not, I can do that next week, when I´m home again.
                                Best regards, Mike
                                vintage-rado.de

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