Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Story of a Junk Marstron

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Story of a Junk Marstron

    Those of you who saw my "Leather or SS" post the other day may remember I mentioned I had acquired a junk rated Marstron. Well here it is. What mostly caught my attention, apart from the fact that I had been looking for a Marstron and being junk it was likely to be cheap (AU$67 as turned out) was that it came with this marvelous display box.

    ff1.jpg

    So it arrived somewhat scratched and battered, as expected and I opened it up and was dismayed to find a white spotted battery still clamped in place and even more so when I cleaned off the top of the battery to find it was a Union Carbide 301. These are mercury batteries that were banned 2002, so this battery has been in the watch for perhaps 15 to 18 years. You can see the state of the orange cellophane insulator that sits under the negative contact arm.

    ff2.jpgff3.jpgff3b.jpg

    So I brushed off both the battery contacts with a glass pen and put them in a US cleaner for ten minutes while I carefully brushed out the rest of the powdered debris, replaced the cellophane isolator with some other plastic material and the battery with a new 1136 silver oxide. I was amazed to see the balance wheel spring into life (see video).



    Just a quick observation at this point. I don't see why these watches have a moving anchor logo. There is no part of the movement that relies on kinetic energy from the wearer. There are moving weights in the form of magnets on the balance wheel but they are moved by a coil. Ok on with the story.

    I cleaned and gently polished the case and the bracelet, which I re-brushed with the glass pen. The end links on these bracelets are ridiculous , almost impossible to get them sitting right, but it’ll have to do. Anyway here it is, my junk Marstron in it’s lovely green display case.

    ff4.jpgff5.jpg
    Last edited by Tim.; 04-20-2017, 08:59 PM.

  • #2
    Tim, that is awesome congratulations.

    Comment


    • #3
      Have fun with that chunk of funk!
      Pimpclinic.v.s.o.p.

      Comment


      • #4
        Good work Tim. The Marstron is a nice, unique watch in the Rado line up. Enjoy it!
        http://s145.photobucket.com/user/sco...deshow/Watches

        Comment


        • #5
          Good save Tim!

          I think Rado viewed these movements as more like the automatics than they were like handwinds. Most people wore only one watch, so neither the automtics nor the electro-mechanicals "ever" needed winding.
          Last edited by Henry Krinkle; 04-21-2017, 11:13 AM.
          Solve all your doubts through question mode.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi!

            Great watch and great work!
            Itīs a watch before the Quartz era with Dynotron movement
            Technically seen they replaced the automatically or manually winded spring mechanism by an electrical micromotor.
            If you associate "automatic" at a watch with "you donīt need to wind it", itīs still an automatic.
            I think thatīs the reason why those early electrical Rado watches still had the moving anchor.
            Last edited by mike184; 04-21-2017, 01:57 PM.
            Best regards, Mike
            vintage-rado.de

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mike184 View Post
              Hi!

              Great watch and great work!
              Itīs a watch before the Qartz era with Dynotron movement
              Technically seen they replaced the automatically or manually winded spring mechanism by an electrical micromotor.
              If you associate "automatic" at a watch with "you donīt need to wind it", itīs still an automatic.
              I think thatīs the reason why those early electrical Rado watches still had the moving anchor.
              That's my theory as well...but they deviated from this practice when the early Quartz and Electrosonic models came out with fixed anchors.



              Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

              Comment


              • #8
                A quick update.

                Just a quick update on this. I have been wearing this watch on a fairly regular rotation since the restoration and apart from changing the date by one for the end of April, I have not had to reset it at all. So that's 16 days of maintaining time, to within seconds, from a watch that must have been dormant, with a leaky mercury battery, for more than 10 years, I'm amazed. It's a testament to the designers and engineers who made these movements. I had read anecdotal evidence of them being a pretty reliable watch and I'm pleased to confirm that to be the truth , at least in this case, which I would consider to be fairly difficult test for any watch.
                Last edited by Tim.; 05-06-2017, 04:45 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tim. View Post
                  Just a quick update on this. I have been wearing this watch on a fairly regular rotation since the restoration and apart from changing the date by one for the end of April, I have not had to reset it at all. So that's 16 days of maintaining time, to within seconds, from a watch that must have been dormant, with a leaky mercury battery, for more than 10 years, I'm amazed. It's a testament to the designers and engineers who made these movements. I had read anecdotal evidence of them being a pretty reliable watch and I'm pleased to confirm that to be the truth , at least in this case, which I would consider to be fairly difficult test for any watch.
                  I'm glad it worked out for you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tim. View Post
                    Just a quick update on this. I have been wearing this watch on a fairly regular rotation since the restoration and apart from changing the date by one for the end of April, I have not had to reset it at all. So that's 16 days of maintaining time, to within seconds, from a watch that must have been dormant, with a leaky mercury battery, for more than 10 years, I'm amazed. It's a testament to the designers and engineers who made these movements. I had read anecdotal evidence of them being a pretty reliable watch and I'm pleased to confirm that to be the truth , at least in this case, which I would consider to be fairly difficult test for any watch.
                    That is quite a good report. I have owned several Marstrons and a few Newtronics and found that most of them ran quite well without me having had any service performed at all. Clean ones, with a new, correct battery added, were reliable and accurate. Enjoy that beauty!
                    Time is Money, except on Dark Side of the Moon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Greetings from (my) Mars(tron)!
                      I can sign your report, these are very accurate and reliable. And I really like the design.

                      Best regards, Mike
                      vintage-rado.de

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X